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Where to Buy an Arm Server

Being Arm enthusiast’s and deeply embedded in the Arm Server ecosystem, one of the questions we get asked often is,

“Where can I buy an Arm Server?”

In the past, it was difficult to actually find Arm Server hardware available to individual end-users. Not long ago, the only way to gain access to Arm Servers was to have NDA’s with major OEM’s or having the right connections to get engineering-sample hardware. However, over the course of the past 2 to 3 years, more providers have entered the market and hardware is now readily available to consumers. Here are some of the easiest ways to buy an Arm Server, although this list is not exhaustive. These servers all have great performance, relatively low costs, and are well supported.

First and foremost, the AMD Opteron A1100 may not be a commercial success, but it is a fantastic Arm Server platform that is supported upstream and runs perfect out-of-the-box. The SoftIron OverDrive 1000 comes in a small desktop style case, but the OverDrive 3000 series comes in a 1U chassis ready for rackmount installation. It has a BMC, 10 GBE ethernet, 14 SATA ports (!), and 2 PCIe slots. A standard UEFI boot process allows for easy installation of CentOS, RedHat, Debian, Ubuntu, SUSE, and any other Linux flavor that has an ARM64 build.

Next up is the Cavium ThunderX, and the newly released ThunderX2. These chips are sold in servers from several vendors, which come in various shapes and sizes. Some of the examples we’ve found include the System76 Starling, the Avantek R-series in both 1U and 2U sizes, and the Gigabyte Arm offering that closely match Avantek’s specs. There are High Density designs, single processor and dual processor options, and 10 GBE as well as SFP options available.

Finally, there is the Qualcomm Centriq 2400 CPU, with it’s powerful “Falkor” cores and robust networking options. One word of caution is that Qualcomm recently cut staffing in it’s Datacenter division, and rumors have been swirling that they are looking to exit the business. However, the CPU is featured in servers built by SolarFlare, though there is no mention of price.

One last note to make, is that we expect to see the newly formed Ampere Computing release details soon on their latest Arm Server CPU, which is based on the IP gained from Applied Micro and their X-Gene 3 SoC. We will be sure to post an article containing info on that CPU once it’s released.

Be sure to check back often for all things Arm Server related!

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ARM Server Update, Summer 2018

Continuing our quarterly ARM Server update series, it is now Summer 2018 so it is time to review the ARM Server news and ecosystem updates from the past few months!  This blog series only covers the ARM Server highlights, but for more in-depth ARM Server news be sure to check out the Works on Arm Newsletter, delivered every Friday by Ed Vielmetti!

Looking at our recent blog posts, the most important headline seems to be the rumored exit from the business by Qualcomm.  Although, at the moment, this has not been confirmed, if true it would be a major setback for ARM Servers in the datacenter.  The Qualcomm Centriq had been shown to be very effective by CloudFlare for their distributed caching workload, and had been shown by Microsoft to be running a portion of the Azure workload as well.

However, just as Qualcomm is rumored to be exiting, Cavium has released the new ThunderX2 to general availability, and several new designs have now been shown and are listed for sale.  The ThunderX2 processor is a 32-core design that can directly compete with Xeons, and provides all of the platform features that a hyperscaler would expect.

Finally, in software news, Ubuntu has released it’s latest 18.04 Bionic Beaver release, which is an LTS version, thus offering 5 years of support.  As in the past, there is an ARM64 version of Ubuntu, which should technically work on any UEFI standard ARM Server.  Examples include Ampere X-Gene servers, Cavium ThunderX servers, Qualcomm, Huawei, HP Moonshot, and AMD Seattle servers.

As always, make sure to check back for more ARM Server and Datacenter industry news, or follow us on Twitter for daily updates on all things ARM, IoT, single board computers, edge computing, and more!

 

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ARM Server Update, Fall/Winter 2017

It has been far too long since our last blog post, and there have been many changes in the ARM Server ecosystem (as usual!) since our last update. Here we will recap some of the major highlights and product announcements of the past several months in 2017.

First and foremost, ARM Servers are gaining traction with 2 major product releases:

Next, there has been major Operating System news as well, with Red Hat formally releasing Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 7.4 for ARM. This allows customers of Red Hat to have a fully supported OS like they are already accustomed to with their x86 offering.

In the SBC world, Fedora 27 was recently released with additional and expanded support for ARM-powered boards. The Dragonboard 410c and HiKey from 96Boards are two popular boards now officially supported, along with the RaspberryPi 3.

And finally, ARM Servers have been gaining quite a bit of media attention due to industry mergers and acquisitions (well, proposals). Marvell has made a bid to acquire Cavium, and Broadcom has pursued Qualcomm, although that deal appears to be opposed by Qualcomm at the moment.

As always, we will continue to watch the industry closely, so check back for updates, hopefully in a more timely fashion next time. 🙂