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Prototype Raspberry Pi Cluster Board

The first samples of the miniNodes Raspberry Pi Cluster Board have arrived, and testing can now begin!

Thanks to the very gracious Arm Innovator Program, miniNodes was able to design and build this board with the help of Gumstix!  The design includes 5 Raspberry Pi Compute Module slots, an integrated Ethernet Switch, and power delivered to each node via the PCB.  All that is required are the Raspberry Pi CoM’s, and a single power supply to run the whole cluster.

We are in the process of validating the hardware, and ensuring proper functionality, but hope to launch the board soon!

mininodes-raspberry-pi-cluster-board

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miniNodes ARM Innovators Program Interview

The full Arm Innovators Program interview is now posted, and we are proud to be highlighted by Arm for our innovations in the Arm Server ecosystem!

As you can see, we are currently prototyping a Raspberry Pi Cluster PCB that will hold 5 Raspberry Pi Computer on Module (CoM) boards, with a power input and ethernet switch built in.

This Raspberry Pi Cluster Board will allow the Docker, Kubernetes, OpenFasS, Minio, and other cluster projects to easily develop, test, and build their software in a cheap and convenient way, with no cabling mess.  Home automation, IoT, and hardware hacking are other potential uses for the board.

We’re still a few weeks away from launching, but keep watching this space as we will be sure to make an announcement as soon as it is ready!

mininodes-arm-innovator

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ARM Server Linux Update, June 2016

As usual, a lot has changed in just a short time since our last update.  Here are some of the highlights from industry news.

First and foremost, the RaspberryPi 3 has continued to be the most popular ARM single board computer.  It now includes WiFi and Bluetooth, and the official Raspbian operating system has been upgraded to include support for the new features.  While it has a 64-bit processor, for the time being it still uses a 32-bit operating system.

Just a few days ago, we got some detail on the Cavium ThunderX2 processor that is forthcoming.  This is an enterprise-grade processor that will have 54 cores and support up to 100gb of ethernet bandwidth.  It will deliver 2x to 3x the performance of the current ThunderX processor, and should be able to compete head-to-head with Xeon’s in many workloads.

Finally, the Pine64 has been shipping in volume now, with most Kickstarter backers having received their boards.  The Pine64 is based on a 64-bit Allwinner A64 processor, which is not the most powerful around, but it sets a new low-price for 64-bit ARM hardware.  At just $15 for the entry level Pine64, the price of 64-bit ARM hardware has dropped from $3,000 to $15 in the course of about 1 year.  Talk about rapid innovation!

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Hosted Raspberry Pi 3 Servers Now Available!

miniNodes.com is proud to be the first cloud hosting provider to offer the new Raspberry Pi 3 as a hosted server.  The Raspberry Pi 3 combines a powerful new Broadcom quad-core 64-bit ARM processor, 1gb of RAM, and the reliable Raspbian Stretch linux operating system.  This makes the Raspberry Pi 3 a great platform for a small ARM server that offers plenty of compute capacity for basic services such as hosting a website or email, API hosting and development, lightweight development frameworks such as NodeJS application hosting, Internet of Things gateways and communication servers, IoT endpoints, Azure Edge container hosts, and more.  The Raspberry Pi 3 server is also a great way to experiment with ARM servers in the cloud, and ensure code compatibility with other more powerful ARM servers that are forthcoming.  Each hosted Raspberry Pi 3 server comes with SSH access and a dedicated IP address, making deployments to the server easy and familiar to developers.

Check them out here:  https://www.mininodes.com/product/raspberry-pi-3-server/

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HOW-TO: Install Minecraft Server on the Raspberry Pi Server or Ubuntu 14.04 ARM Server

Minecraft is one of the most popular games played online, and installing your own Minecraft Server on ARM is easy! These instructions will allow you to install Minecraft Server on the Raspberry Pi, or on our Ubuntu 14.04 ARM Server.

First, we need to connect to our node via SSH.

Once logged in, lets make sure we keep our downloads in our home directory for ease of use:

cd /home

Once in the home directory, we are first going to download and set up Java.

We do that by running:

sudo wget --no-check-certificate http://www.java.net/download/jdk8/archive/b111/binaries/jdk-8-ea-b111-linux-arm-vfp-hflt-09_oct_2013.tar.gz

After Java has finished downloading, we need to extract it:

sudo tar zxvf jdk-8-ea-b111-linux-arm-vfp-hflt-09_oct_2013.tar.gz -C /opt/

If the download and extract were successful, we will test to make sure Java is working by:

sudo /opt/jdk1.8.0/bin/java -version

We should see this, confirming Java is now ready:

java version "1.8.0-ea"
Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.8.0-ea-b111)

Java HotSpot(TM) Client VM (build 25.0-b53, mixed mode)

Finally, let’s remove the downloaded gzip to save a bit of disk space:

sudo rm jdk-8-ea-b111-linux-arm-vfp-hflt-09_oct_2013.tar.gz

Now, it is time to download Minecraft Server!

wget https://s3.amazonaws.com/MinecraftDownload/launcher/minecraft_server.jar

Once it has finished downloading, we can launch it by running:

sudo /opt/jdk1.8.0/bin/java -Xmx1024M -Xms1024M -jar minecraft_server.jar

The Raspberry Pi only has 512mb of RAM, so it will not actually allocate 1024…but it will take approximately 400mb or so that is available to it.

The Ubuntu 14.04 ARM server does have a full gig of RAM, but the OS takes up a bit of that. So Minecraft Server will probably reserve about 750mb to 800mb of memory to run in. This is plenty.

At this point, Minecraft Server will go through it’s startup routine, and you will be able to join the newly created world by pointing your game to the IP Address of your node (you can also modify game variables by editing the server.properties file, located in your /home directory.)

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Hosted Raspberry Pi Servers Now Available on miniNodes.com

miniNodes is proud to announce it is the first provider in North America to offer hosted Raspberry Pi servers.  Although they are small in size, Raspberry Pi Model B+ servers are able to perform many of the same functions and roles larger servers typically fulfill.  Raspberry Pi servers can host websites, email, databases, and DNS, can be used for learning programming languages like Python, Ruby, NodeJS, Bash scripting, and Linux administration, and can even be used as Minecraft servers.

Our hosted Raspberry Pi servers come in either 16gb or 32gb sizes, combined of course with the Pi’s ARM Cortex processor and 512mb of RAM.  Each node has a static IP Address, and SSH access.

For more details or to order, see https://www.mininodes.com/product/raspberry-pi-mininode/